Kay Keeshan Hamod Award for Scholarship in History

Kay Keeshan Hamod Scholarship

Contributed by Honors Alumnus David Hamod in honor of his mother, this scholarship applauds a history major for designing a distinguished Honors Thesis or Project in that discipline. This award is meant to support work on that project, so recipients must be full-time students in History and members of the Honors Program in the semester they apply for the Hamod Scholarship and in the year when they hold it. They must also be members of the University of Iowa Honors Program.

Please note! The application window for the Hamod Scholarship has been shifted to the fall semester to better align the process with the honors thesis development process. 


Eligibility:

  • Must be a History major
  • Must be a member in good standing of the University of Iowa Honors Program at the time of application and award. 
  • Must be enrolled in a degree granting program and seeking first undergraduate degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
  • Must be enrolled full-time as a junior or senior in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences in Fall 2020
  • Must continue full-time as a junior or senior in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences in 2020-21

Renewability:

This scholarship is not automatically renewable. If current award recipients continue to meet eligibility criteria, they must submit a new application each year to be considered for this award

  • Applications should be submitted electronically to kasey-befeler@uiowa.edu
  • Applications are due by October 15, 2020.

Contacts on campus:

  • Kasey Befeler, Department of History, kasey-befeler@uiowa.edu
  • Camille Socarras, Honors Scholarship Coordinator, camille-socarras@uiowa.edu

Recipients:

2019

Cameron Moeller
Cameron Moeller, History, International Relations, Davenport, IA

Congratulations to the 2019 Hamod Scholarship recipient and Honors senior, Cameron Moeller, for his research and thesis on British imperial rule in India and the recruitment of native soldiers of the Indian Army. Cameron is double majoring in history and international relations with a certificate in museum studies. He is a member of the Student Judicial Court and has previously worked as an ICRU fellow and archaeology lab assistant for the Department of Anthropology, as well as an undergraduate TA. Congratulations, Cameron! Read the abstract of his thesis below!

Variably Innate: Inconsistent British Perceptions of Martial Races in the Late-Victorian Indian Army

This thesis examines the malleability of the concept of “martial races,” the classification system by which British imperial officers recruited soldiers for the Indian Army, the mainstay of British military power in India. Though led by British officers, the army was composed of Indian soldiers known as sepoys. Seeking to ensure the loyalty and effectiveness of sepoys, British officers only recruited groups they considered to be martial races. This imposed classification was based on traits, like physique and bravery, which were considered innate to certain Indian ethnic groups, referred to as “races” by the British. The concept of martial races was central to army organization, and the British did not question its validity. Using India Office Military Department documents, this thesis argues that just who was considered a martial race was the subject of much more debate than has previously been appreciated. A martial race could be lauded by one British officer but scorned by another. Different martial races came and went, recruited and discharged following the conflicting opinions of different officers. Sepoys were caught at the center of this back and forth, but they were not helpless, as the value the British attached to martial status, combined with the threat of mutiny, gave sepoys indirect influence over their compensation and treatment.